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Thread: Would You Invest in English Grammar Lessons?

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  1. #1
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    Would You Invest in English Grammar Lessons?

    This is mostly for those who do not speak English as a first language, or those who wish to improve their grammar skills beyond the norm...would you invest in grammar lessons or information products?

    This is a question I ask because I'm considering producing workbooks geared towards those wanting to improve their grammar. While my main target is freelance writers wanting to make more money, I also want to target the general public.

    Please let me know what you think about this idea. Honestly.

  2. what you need to invest are hollywood movies that you should enjoy.
    learn english while you watch movies


  3. #3
    Corey, perhaps we should talk, even if you are too busy to take on additional writing assignments. I own an English academy here in Spain, currently employing 4 teachers with students ranging from beginner to advanced, and will soon be producing course work for tourism and retail.

    We may be able to help each other.

  4. #4
    I'm not a writer but I'd invest in improving my grammar

  5. #5
    I would not as my Grammar is quite decent enough. But what country would you be targeting? US/UK? don't they have 'English' as a subject where grammar is taught?
    As far as my education is concerned, i had to study 'English' as a compulsory subject till the 12th grade so there's no question of learning further, but still I see many who struggle and still can't master it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snak3 View Post
    I would not as my Grammar is quite decent enough. But what country would you be targeting? US/UK? don't they have 'English' as a subject where grammar is taught?
    I am targeting non-native speakers, specifically writers looking to make more money from their article writing, and looking to communicate and build repeat clients with better effectiveness.

    As far as the UK/USA question goes - American schools are notorious for not being the best schools on the planet due to the concern for test scores. I know that if I hadn't liked reading, my grammar would probably suck. Grammar wasn't pounded into us until about 9th grade, when it would affect most people's grades and when it is mostly too late to fix it using conventional teaching.

    I have no thoughts on the UK schools as I don't live in the UK, and even if I did, British English and American English have grammatical variations. Were I to target the UK, I'd have to hire someone as a consultant.

    As far as my education is concerned, i had to study 'English' as a compulsory subject till the 12th grade so there's no question of learning further, but still I see many who struggle and still can't master it.
    Grammar is hard, and people who teach it often make it harder. However, I'm not proposing conventional or "boring" teaching. Even I can doze off when doing worksheets for class. That is why these lessons have to be beneficial, simple, informative, and entertaining.

    I kind of want to be a stickler and pick apart your first sentence. "quite decent enough" is excessive so you can just say "quite decent" or "decent enough" or even just "decent." That was just for fun. Also you missed a comma in your third sentence.

    I am just messing with you.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by CoreyFreeman View Post
    I have no thoughts on the UK schools as I don't live in the UK, and even if I did, British English and American English have grammatical variations. Were I to target the UK, I'd have to hire someone as a consultant.
    They're not that different, grammatically I'd say 99.999% the same, some Americans and Canadians will often drop a determiner (eg the), whereas people from the British Isles and the Commonwealth won't.

    Quote Originally Posted by CoreyFreeman View Post
    Grammar is hard, and people who teach it often make it harder. However, I'm not proposing conventional or "boring" teaching. Even I can doze off when doing worksheets for class. That is why these lessons have to be beneficial, simple, informative, and entertaining.
    Agreed

    Quote Originally Posted by CoreyFreeman View Post
    I kind of want to be a stickler and pick apart your first sentence. "quite decent enough" is excessive so you can just say "quite decent" or "decent enough" or even just "decent." That was just for fun. Also you missed a comma in your third sentence.
    I can ignore the redundancy, but missing a comma is worthy of walking the proverbial plank - people, commas represent a pause, just like you would when you need to take a break to catch your breath, and they are critical to good communication. Remember, after every part of a sentence, insert a comma.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by elbandelero View Post
    Remember, after every part of a sentence, insert a comma.
    Umm...no. Remind me to get you a workbook. You DO NOT use a comma after every part of a sentence. You use a comma for a variation of reasons:

    Interjections
    Some Conjunctions (joining two independent phrases)
    The beginnings of some sentences (eg. meanwhile, tomorrow,)
    Lists

    There can be over-usage of commas. What you are talking about (the natural pauses?) is called a caesura, which comes from Caeser, who was a great speech giver. Caesura means the pauses we naturally include when speaking. While it's a pretty good rule-of-thumb to insert a comma when one pauses, that is not always the case...

    Also I sent you a PM and a visitor message to ask you what the heck you wanted to talk to me about but honestly tourism doesn't interest me.

    @Bogart

    I will be selling the intermediate-expert levels of lessons. The beginner lessons will be free and hopefully draw in traffic. Thank you for your comments.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by CoreyFreeman View Post
    Umm...no. Remind me to get you a workbook.

    Also I sent you a PM and a visitor message to ask you what the heck you wanted to talk to me about but honestly tourism doesn't interest me.
    Perhaps it is better if we don't communicate, I'm sorry to say your comments here are a tad on the obnoxious side. I seem to recall replying to your PM, though I can't find it in the sent mails, so perhaps a glitch in the system prevented you receiving it.

    As for a comma, they can be used in a variety of contexts, and as you correctly state, they can be used in lists, pairs, to differentiate subordination, amongst adverbial clauses, or when quoting direct speech.

    However, it goes without saying that many second language students, and a fair few native language speakers don't separate the parts of a sentence well enough, and a GOOD rule of thumb is to insert a comma where a pause would be expected. This is advice that helps students. As you teach more students you will find that breaking grammar rules down into small chunks to be learned makes a huge difference to the student.

    Your attempt to ridicule me is noted. However, I'd suggest you research the changes that are occurring in the English language before making statements about correct English. The fact is that over 2 billion people on this planet now speak English, and only 450-500 million of them are native speakers.

    This means that non-native speakers are now driving the development of our language, and obscure rules that satisfy university professors and purists are being thrown out. The caesura is already common within Europe, and is taught by Cambridge as a grammar rule, and has been recognized by the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. In addition, the caesura is appearing more frequently in the Collins Bank of English, which is the largest corpus of English.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoreyFreeman View Post
    This is mostly for those who do not speak English as a first language, or those who wish to improve their grammar skills beyond the norm...would you invest in grammar lessons or information products?
    Grammar lessons appear to be a good idea for content. I would expect that you would get a lot of repeat traffic as well.
    How do you plan on monetizing the content? Or do you plan on selling the lessons?

    Quote Originally Posted by elbandelero View Post
    Corey, perhaps we should talk, even if you are too busy to take on additional writing assignments. I own an English academy here in Spain, currently employing 4 teachers with students ranging from beginner to advanced, and will soon be producing course work for tourism and retail.
    I got a TEFL certificate at Princeton University. I had a few job offers in Mexico and China. The pay was little more than beer money. The job market for Americans dried up in Spain dried up after Spain became a full member of the EC.

    It seemed that most of the English lessons were geared toward tourism. I knew some students studying at the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Most of them had some sort of job with tourism. There didn't seem to be a much focus on business.

    Quote Originally Posted by CoreyFreeman View Post
    I am targeting non-native speakers, specifically writers looking to make more money from their article writing, and looking to communicate and build repeat clients with better effectiveness.
    I think a good target market is the businessman in addition to the freelancer. People in business generally have money money to spend.

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