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Thread: Spain’s sunshine toll: Row over proposed solar tax

  1. #1

    Spain’s sunshine toll: Row over proposed solar tax

    "We will be the only country in the world charging for the use of the sun," says Jaume Serrasolses. "Strange things are happening in Spain. This is one of them."
    Mr Serrasolses, the secretary of an association promoting the use of solar energy, SEBA, is referring to the government's proposal for a tax solely on those who generate their own electricity.
    They would pay a backup toll for the power from their solar panels, in addition to the access toll paid by everyone who consumes electricity from the conventional grid.

    "Solar energy is much more expensive than that mass-produced by large utilities”

    Although the tolls vary, if you pay an access toll of 0.053 euros per kWh, you could face a backup toll of 0.068 euros per kWh.
    The new tax would extend the average time it would take for solar panels to pay for themselves from eight to 25 years, according to the solar lobby.
    The government says that with increasing "self-consumption", the income for conventional energy systems will decrease, but grid maintenance will cost the same.
    "If I produce my own energy, but am connected to the grid, having the backup in case my production fails, I have to contribute to the cost of the entire system," says Energy Secretary Alberto Nadal.
    The government is hoping the energy reform will settle a debt of 26bn euros (£22bn; $35bn), which has built up over years as a result of regulating energy costs and prices.

    Broken promises
    This is just the latest in a series of setbacks for the renewable energy sector.

    The government has gradually lowered a feed-in tariff - a scheme that paid people to produce their own "green electricity" - first reducing the period over which it was paid, then limiting it to already existing installations and finally an energy reform in July opened up the possibility of withdrawing it retroactively.
    At the same time it has not endorsed net metering, a policy allowing solar panel owners to send surplus energy to the grid and use it later. The idea was part of a previous proposal but was not included in the latest reform proposal.
    But while the government may have been heavily promoting solar energy six years ago, those who followed that lead may now pay dearly for their investment.
    "The majority are people like your or my parents who at one time had savings and wanted to make an investment with a better return," says Piet Holtrop, a Dutch lawyer who is defending over 1,000 of them.

    "Many of these people are going to lose their houses (that they used as collateral to buy solar panels). They are unable to pay back at the bank. They can't sell the installations, because the government has made them toxic assets," Mr Holtrop says.
    Though many people believe the government has succumbed to pressure from the big five energy companies, Mr Nadal insists that "solar energy is much more expensive than that mass-produced by large utilities".
    He adds that Spain is now paying for being at the forefront of solar energy development: "If we hadn't rushed into constructing large quantities of photovoltaic installations, we could have had them much better for [a] much lower price. It would have been much better introducing them step by step."
    Read the entire article at: BBC News - Spain’s sunshine toll: Row over proposed solar tax

    They are taxing the sun, LOL
    Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities.

    Voltaire


  2. #2
    It does not surprise me that Spain is starting to realize that they cannot keep subsidizing renewable energy. Although I would like to see more use of renewable energy, it is an economic loser. Many analysts have concluded that Spain's massive and irrational commitment to renewable energy several years ago was a primary factor in their economic decline. It looked good on paper, but did not work so well in reality.

    I looked in to putting up solar panels on my home in Phoenix. The problem is that the breakeven on the cost is 20 to 25 years, including government subsidies. That's also the life of the solar panels, so you can never come out ahead. Now they are talking about eliminating the subsidies. Without that, it will continue to be cheaper to stay on the electric grid.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote." -- Benjamin Franklin


  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by TopDogger View Post
    It does not surprise me that Spain is starting to realize that they cannot keep subsidizing renewable energy. Although I would like to see more use of renewable energy, it is an economic loser. Many analysts have concluded that Spain's massive and irrational commitment to renewable energy several years ago was a primary factor in their economic decline. It looked good on paper, but did not work so well in reality.
    Spain made some huge mismanaged investments in real estate, there are new cities empty.

    I looked in to putting up solar panels on my home in Phoenix. The problem is that the breakeven on the cost is 20 to 25 years, including government subsidies. That's also the life of the solar panels, so you can never come out ahead. Now they are talking about eliminating the subsidies. Without that, it will continue to be cheaper to stay on the electric grid.
    I get to the conclusion that only new homes could benefit from an installation of solar system in serie, it doesn't worth to invest in a solar system on old house individually.
    Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities.

    Voltaire


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