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Thread: Paid Advertisements Affects Organic SEO

  1. #1

    Exclamation Paid Advertisements Affects Organic SEO

    We are aware in paid advertising and first thing in mind is it's a way of merely buying people's attention and time, but there is more than that and the bloggers as well as the advertisers doesn't noticed while in the process. An interesting discussion about how these paid activities can add improvements for SEO results, such as for social shares, for links, for email marketing, for content investments, and for the entire organic mediums.

    Sounds new, but its actually related and make it up. Of course Google's guidelines is throughout on this process. An instance like "Hi, I'd like to have a link within your site and a followed link directly," then "Sure, give me first the $500 and i will include your followed link." This is not recommended and Google will slap you because its a sign of spam that intends to manipulate the rankings.

    For the good side, Google consider and even assist, promote, as well as run systems, an entire advertisement network throughout this like "Hello, I would like to rent some ad sections from your site." then "Yes, the sidebar ad spots are no followed and they cost $140 per month." It is advisable and Google approved.

  2. #2
    Bottom line with advertising, paid?
    How the freak is google going to know I sold any on my blog?
    It is not on my blog anywhere that I sell advertising.
    And if I do sell advertising, it is usually pm on a forum or email.
    People obsess too much about buying and selling links.
    Screw google.

  3. #3
    There are ways to identify paid advertising links.

    1. Contextual links to sites unrelated to the content, especially multiple links to the same site within an article. This is what identified and got the blog networks banned.

    2. Links to poor quality sites on almost every page in a site. A natural link would be to a high quality site that already ranks well. Another issue with the blog networks.

    3. Certain types of unnatural sidebar or footer links.

    4. Regions of a page that are obviously reserved for advertising and contain advertising wording. This is common in the travel industry and a few other industries.

    According to Google, selling advertising links is not a problem as long as the rel="nofollow" attribute is included in the link. An advertising link should be able to promote traffic, but not pass link juice.

    Keep in mind that Google doesn't like anyone to make money on the Internet unless their name is Google. Over the past few years, they have destroyed billion of dollars of value on the web.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote." -- Benjamin Franklin


  4. #4
    All links on my site are do follow!
    Google has yet in all these years to deprecate my blog.

  5. #5
    Almost everything that Google does is random. Some sites get hit, while some sites do not. Eventually, most get hit if they are violating the rules.

    You would not necessarily know if you got hit by a penalty. Some sites get hit from their start and never reach their potential. Some penalties only cause a reduction in rank for your most competitive keywords. Those are the keywords that normally drive the most traffic naturally, and not necessarily the keywords that a site owner thinks are important. I've seen sites that were in the top 5 for their top money keywords that drive the most traffic, and then end up on page 5 -- but only for the money keywords.

    The natural links in your site should be do-follow. The advertising links and links to questionable sites are the ones that need to be nofollow.

    The point is that just because you have not been hit thus far doesn't mean you won't get hit. Some penalties are automatically applied, while others require a Google rep to look at the site and apply a manual penalty. The automatic penalties can be automatically lifted with the next update if you fix the problems. The manual penalties require a reconsideration request.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote." -- Benjamin Franklin


  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by TopDogger View Post
    The point is that just because you have not been hit thus far doesn't mean you won't get hit. Some penalties are automatically applied, while others require a Google rep to look at the site and apply a manual penalty. The automatic penalties can be automatically lifted with the next update if you fix the problems. The manual penalties require a reconsideration request.
    Most of the people doesn't noticed this kind of behavior from Google and still struggling to find out what happen and why? concerning the website.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by StevePoster View Post
    Most of the people doesn't noticed this kind of behavior from Google and still struggling to find out what happen and why? concerning the website.
    True. There are also page level penalties and site level penalties. You can have several pages in a site that rank well, while the rest never show up at all for any searches. Other penalties only affect certain keywords or competitive keywords. We saw that happen with Penguin where sites using crappy directories with keyword-rich anchor text found their former page 1 sites on page 5 or page 10, but only for the most important keywords that drove the most traffic. Those keywords were coincidentally the same used in too many text links.

    Google is a crafty bugger. There is no one single definition that applies to the range of penalties they can apply.

    The real key with penalties is how well the site ranks for your most important keywords. I frequently run into new clients who are proud of a #1 Google ranking, but it's most often for a keyword phrase with zero searches. They are usually shocked to find out their #1 ranking is not driving any traffic.

    The one thing I miss about the PageRank updates is that it could be used to identify penalized pages. Any mature page that went through at least one PageRank update and still showed a PageRank of n/a had been penalized. That happened to literally all the inner pages of the thousands of crappy directories. That was Google's way of making sure that page could not pass link juice.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote." -- Benjamin Franklin


  8. #8
    There really should be some method of knowing if a site has been slammed with penalties aside from just not seeing good results from the SE itself. Google has a lot of power over online traffic now. It's like webmasters are the playthings of an arbitrary and capricious god with a vindictive streak.
    -- Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and good with ketchup. --

  9. #9
    Again, why I do not bother with google or other se's.
    Though I do rank high in google and bing.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by robjones View Post
    It's like webmasters are the playthings of an arbitrary and capricious god with a vindictive streak.
    Exactly! And that god doesn't give a damn about about the billions of dollars of web value they have destroyed.

    Quote Originally Posted by iowadawg View Post
    Again, why I do not bother with google or other se's.
    Though I do rank high in google and bing.
    It's great if you rank well, but high rankings are irrelevant unless it's for keywords people use often in searches. Even if you rank well for your blog name, you won't drive any traffic from people who do not know who you are. That's where brand recognition is important.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote." -- Benjamin Franklin


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