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Thread: Striking Unions Put Twinkies out of Business

  1. #21
    Sorta reminds me of the guys that took Obama stimulus money and then went bankrupt.

    Starting to look like our economy is composed of two distinct sides, neither of which can be trusted.
    -- Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and good with ketchup. --

  2. #22
    Frankly that's very bad new because we go into radicalisation either way. It is like the last man standing...

  3. #23
    CEO was fired once the board found out how much he got.

    Remember, buyer does not have to buy any of the bakeries.
    Grupo Bimbo only wants the trademarks, recipes, etc.

    Same with any other company.

    Oh, on of the union rules that cost the company so much?
    Separate truck for the products!
    Means, instead of loading twinkies, ding dongs, etc into one truck for delivery, they had to have a separate truck for the products!
    Meant more drivers, trucks, fuel, etc.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by iowadawg View Post
    Oh, on of the union rules that cost the company so much?
    Separate truck for the products!
    Means, instead of loading twinkies, ding dongs, etc into one truck for delivery, they had to have a separate truck for the products!
    Meant more drivers, trucks, fuel, etc.
    Union rules are really productive. My dad worked for a printing company for several years. The company bought a huge printing press and hired two union guys to operate it. The union came in and said he had to have four guys to run it. The company showed them the manufacturer's documentation that recommended two operators. The union insisted on 4 operators and forced the company to hire two more union workers. Two of the guys guys sat at a table and played cards wile the other two ran the press because only two guys could operate the press at one time. They worked in shifts and periodically switched from operators to card players. True story of union productivity.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote." -- Benjamin Franklin


  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by TopDogger View Post
    Union rules are really productive. My dad worked for a printing company for several years. The company bought a huge printing press and hired two union guys to operate it. The union came in and said he had to have four guys to run it. The company showed them the manufacturer's documentation that recommended two operators. The union insisted on 4 operators and forced the company to hire two more union workers. Two of the guys guys sat at a table and played cards wile the other two ran the press because only two guys could operate the press at one time. They worked in shifts and periodically switched from operators to card players. True story of union productivity.
    I worked all my life in the printing business. That's right, you needed to be 4 operators but it was long time ago on large offset press like Nebiolo, Planeta, Heidelberg, you name it. Now, the technology is so advanced that you need only 2 operators and the Union should know that. Shinohara, Heidelberg offset press can be programmed and save labor money to employers.

    Most of the time I didn't worked in a print shop with union, the Union are very powerful in the web press business, but not as much as the offset press business.

    For example in France there are different kind of Unions, unfortunately they are politized. Most known Unions are: CGT (communist), CFDT (socialist), FO (right wing), CFTC (Christian) and CGC (managers). Employers have also Unions

  6. #26
    Well, today, the judge in this case approved the liquidation of hostess since mediation went nowhere.

    It's official. Twinkies are toast, at least as far as being a Hostess product is concerned.

    Hostess Brands Inc on Wednesday won permission from a U.S. bankruptcy judge to begin shutting down, and expressed optimism it will find new homes for many of its iconic brands, which include Twinkies, Drake's cakes and Wonder Bread.
    U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Robert Drain in White Plains, N.Y., authorized current management, led by restructuring specialist Gregory Rayburn, to immediately begin efforts to wind down the 82-year-old company, a process expected to take one year.
    "It appears clear to me that the debtors have taken the right course in seeking to implement the wind-down plan as promptly as possible," Drain said near the end of a four-hour hearing.
    The judge authorized Hostess to begin the liquidation process one day after his last-ditch mediation effort between the Irving, Texas-based company and its striking bakers' union broke down.
    Hostess CEO Gregory Rayburn testified at a bankruptcy hearing Wednesday that he will have to terminate 15,000 employees immediately. Most of the remaining 3,200 workers are expected to be let go within four months.
    "This is a tragedy, and we're well aware of it," Heather Lennox, a lawyer for Hostess, told the judge. "We are trying to be as sensitive as we can possibly be under the circumstances to the human cost of this."
    The union, the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco and Grain Millers Union, has complained it should not be forced into new wage and benefit cuts, on top of earlier give-backs, while top executives rewarded themselves with higher pay, and that it was "well aware" of the potential consequences of that stance.
    From:
    Bankruptcy judge approves Hostess liquidation - Life Inc.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Natural Elements View Post
    For example in France there are different kind of Unions, unfortunately they are politized. Most known Unions are: CGT (communist), CFDT (socialist), FO (right wing), CFTC (Christian) and CGC (managers). Employers have also Unions
    The majority of union memebers are employed in government and government workers earn on average of 40% more than the private sector.

    Public worker pensions are a looming crisis. For example, Illinois Pension Crisis Now Unfixable | State of Your State and Illinois pension funds have $200 billion in unfunded debt.

    Quote Originally Posted by iowadawg View Post
    Oh, on of the union rules that cost the company so much?
    Hostess has 2 billion dollars in unfunded pension liabilities and most of this will be paid for by the federally sponsored Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC).

    Quote Originally Posted by iowadawg View Post
    Remember, buyer does not have to buy any of the bakeries.
    Grupo Bimbo only wants the trademarks, recipes, etc.

    Separate truck for the products!
    Means, instead of loading twinkies, ding dongs, etc into one truck for delivery, they had to have a separate truck for the products!
    Meant more drivers, trucks, fuel, etc.
    Correct! Most of the jobs at Hostess were in trucking. 6,700 Hostess workers were Teamsters members. Hostess Teamsters workers could have earned between $50,000 to $100,000 a year including base pay and commission. Only 5,000 workers were involved in Food production and represented by the Bakers Union.

    Grupo Bimbo already owns a lot of US brands.

    Arnold Bread
    Entenmann's pastry
    Freihofer's is a bread and pastry
    Stroehmann's
    Sara Lee Bread
    Thomas' English muffins and bagels

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by bogart View Post
    The majority of union memebers are employed in government and government workers earn on average of 40% more than the private sector.

    Public worker pensions are a looming crisis. For example, Illinois Pension Crisis Now Unfixable | State of Your State and Illinois pension funds have $200 billion in unfunded debt.
    I really don't like to level from the bottom, crisis are created by unbalanced wealth, if each side are pulling the string, fatally one day the string broke. To stop the bleeding, the government needs to stand and regulate the importations or even find a system to protect the national businesses by imposing some quotas.

    Look the Chinese people are really smart, they tax like hell all importations and they force international corporations to assemble the products on their mainland with their people. For example China will only authorize the Chinese airlines to use Airbus A320 if they are assembled in China by Chinese workers.

    Why don't we do the same thing?

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Natural Elements View Post
    the government needs to stand and regulate the importations or even find a system to protect the national businesses by imposing some quotas.

    Look the Chinese people are really smart, they tax like hell all importations and they force international corporations to assemble the products on their mainland with their people. For example China will only authorize the Chinese airlines to use Airbus A320 if they are assembled in China by Chinese workers.

    Why don't we do the same thing?
    Classically defined as protectionism. I'm fascinated by the ins and outs of international trade, but unfortunately I'm a novice on the subject. From my laymans view, responding to protectionism, like China's protectionist purchasing policies, with equal and opposite protectionist policies makes sense. Conversely, breaking down import duties and trade barriers with countries who are trading fairly with us and are following the same types of labor rules seems obviously beneficial to everyone concerned.

    As a capitalist, the more societies that rise from the ashes of poverty, the more potential consumers we have for our plasticized garbage.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by obamanation View Post
    Classically defined as protectionism. I'm fascinated by the ins and outs of international trade, but unfortunately I'm a novice on the subject. From my laymans view, responding to protectionism, like China's protectionist purchasing policies, with equal and opposite protectionist policies makes sense. Conversely, breaking down import duties and trade barriers with countries who are trading fairly with us and are following the same types of labor rules seems obviously beneficial to everyone concerned.

    As a capitalist, the more societies that rise from the ashes of poverty, the more potential consumers we have for our plasticized garbage.
    I like the traditional capitalist concept, what I don't like is crowny capitalism, corporate capitalism and anarcho-capitalism.

    I believe that if we want a good system, we have to act like this:

    Country A export to country B $100 billions of goods, country B import $100 billions of goods = fair trade

    If country A export more to country B or vis-versa they should be taxed or they should adjust the balance sheet with the an equal amount.

    Now if we keep going to send any jobs overseas, I am wondering who will buy the goods in 10 or 20 years, even if they offer low price, a lot of people will not be able to buy. As our countries are now post industrial and more toward consumption and services, it will not take long before everybody go down.

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