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Thread: Home Web Hosting

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Sami4u View Post
    Hi,

    Just wondering what is the cost vs expense on all of this? Will this save money in the long run? If so how long?

    Sami
    For long term it save a lot money but there will be some disadvantages also.

    1. Power Backup, is hard to monitor power supply.
    2. Some moody day, my ISP ain't provide 99% stability.


    Currently me running home base Proxy (for my own purpose) web server, with no-ip point to my home base server ... reason my ISP provide dynamic IP (which i can spam other and they can't ban me cause my modem restart every hour).

    For me is much cheaper compare with buying proxy list (also free IP) but i still left web hosting with data center (save a lot headache)......

  2. #12
    If you use a laptop with a battery and AC adapter, it will have built-in power outage protection. And it should consume less power than a desktop box.

    I struggled to get Debian installed due to a boot-up issue so ended up using Puppy Linux. This is well suited to my hardware which only has 256MB of RAM (but the HDD is 500GB lol). Also, it has an efficient web server (Hiawatha) that shouldn't eat up memory like Apache may do.

    I was very tempted to use Windows XP SP3 but finally got Linux working.

    I set up the Linux Firewall to block anything other than port 80 and 22.
    I set the server to have a fixed local IP address.
    I set up the router to open port 80 and forward it to this IP address.

    Then I entered the IP address into another computer's browser to check for the default web page. This proved that the web server was working and allowing http traffic through the fire wall.

    I got my WAN (world-facing) IP address from Google. But I couldn't access the web page in a local browser with this IP address. I guess that loop-back doesn't work? So I uploaded a simple PHP script to one of my web sites to probe the IP address and display the received data. This displayed the web page to show that it was working.

    The next step is to work out how to configure the DNS. Normally, you have at least 2 IP addresses for name servers, but your home server only has 1 IP address. Maybe it's as simple as using the same IP address for both name servers (NS1.yournameserverdomain.com and NS2.yournameserverdomain.com) ?

  3. #13
    You probably do not have to have two nameservers with separate IPs. The second is a backup.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote." -- Benjamin Franklin


  4. #14
    You probably do not have to have two nameservers with separate IPs. The second is a backup.
    Yes, I think the idea is that the look-up starts with NS1 and if it fails then NS2 is used etc. So you could even put a dummy value in maybe if you must enter 2 IPs? The first being the one that works.

  5. #15
    For long term it save a lot money
    Certainly! For example, you are creating a dedicated server box that has virtual hosting for 100's of sites, that may cost you at least $100 per month from a web host i.e. $1200+ a year. So it makes sense to try and host yourself IMO. Especially since many of your sites will be low traffic.

  6. #16
    I configured one of my domains as a name server with ns1.mydomain.com and ns2.mydomain.com pointing to the IP address of my server.

    Also, I set the name servers for one of my domain names to these name servers.

    About 24 hours later, the domain name is not resolving. Also, the server log does not indicate any access from this domain name at the time I tried it. Maybe I need to wait longer since it can take up to say 72 hrs for changes to be reflected for existing domains?

    I am confident about making this work since I can get to my default web page from an external server via the IP address.

    Looks like I need to wait a while longer for changes to propagate. I tested with this tool: http://enc.com.au/itools/nscheck.php

  7. #17
    A good site to check if a domain is resolving is host-tracker.com , test your domain and check the listed ip for each location.

    Also to check your httpd.cnf is good edit your windows host file to point to your site

    Add to bottom of host file, then your site should load.
    serverIp yourdomain.com

  8. #18
    Gavo's tips helped me out.

    I am still figuring out how to make the name servers work. When I ping them, nothing happens. Possibly something to do with needing a DNS zone file?

    An alternative method for DNS that I got working is Dynamic DNS which is a feature offered by domain registrars when you keep using their name servers.

    With this you can specify the IP address of your server in a host record so that your domain resolves to your server IP address via an 'A' record. And the www alias resolves to it via a CNAME record. Then you can run a DNS updater client on your computer to update the IP address as it changes due to router reboots.

    But in my case, I want to have multiple domains, so it would be better if I can get private name servers to work. Then I will only need to update the one domain name with the changing IP address. Although the change in IP address may take longer to resolve than the one with dynamic DNS.

  9. #19
    I am not an expert in this area, but you might be looking at the use of the nameservers incorrectly. Nameservers do not normally point directly to a web site, but rather point to the a host's namservers, which then resolve to the web sites.

    Another possibility: Do you have the ns1 and ns2 entries set up in the DNS zone?
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote." -- Benjamin Franklin


  10. #20
    Nameservers do not normally point directly to a web site, but rather point to the a host's namservers, which then resolve to the web sites.
    This is the area where I need to get more clarity.

    Edit: So I need a name server responder program running on my server?

    I don't understand why specifying an IP address for a name server domain is not enough. So if you ping it, the ping is then relayed to the server and then what happens?

    It's really difficult to understand the mechanism involved and how to set it up. One difficulty is knowing what question to ask.

    In my situation, I set up one of my domains at say Namecheap.com as a name server domain such as ns1.mydomain.com and set it's IP address as that of my web server. Then I assign this name server domain to one of my domain names that this web server will deliver web content for.

    So if I enter my domain name abc.com into a web browser and it's name server is ns1.mydomain.com that is associated with the IP address of my web server that will recognize abc.com in the request, how come it doesn't work?
    Last edited by Andy101; 30 March, 2013 at 17:03 PM. Reason: Some edits

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